Category Archives: Tax Reform

Do You Need a Summary of Tax Reform Changes?

A Summary of Tax Reform Changes and Where Taxpayers Can Find More Information.

In this summary of tax reform, we will see that major tax law modifications affect every taxpayer that files a 2018 tax return this year. This article is to assist taxpayers in fully grasping these changes. Therefore, the IRS has made available some resources that are on the IRS.gov website. Here’s a brief summary of key changes:

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Why Was My Tax Refund Lower This Year?

Was Your Tax Refund Lower Than Expected This Year?

Did you expect have your tax refund lower this year? You are not alone! In fact, the IRS put out a report by the Treasury Department on February 14th. The IRS report said that, the average refund it is paying in 2019 has gone down to $1,949 from $2,135 in the prior year. On average the tax refund decrease was $186 per taxpayer. In addition, the number of taxpayers filing returns so far has Continue reading

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Six New Schedules To File With Form 1040

Forms 1040: Six New Schedules

There are six new schedules some taxpayers will file with the new 2018 IRS Form 1040. This new Form 1040 replaces the prior year Forms 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ. The 2018 IRS Form 1040 uses a cornerstone approach. This means that taxpayers only file the schedules they need with their federal tax return. The expectation is that numerous individuals will not need to file schedules, and only file the Form 1040. Continue reading

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Who Under Prepaid 2018 Taxes? IRS Tax Break?

Under Prepaid 2018 Taxes Happens for Many Reasons for an IRS Tax Break

It’s true, 2018 was an interesting year with tax reform going into affect. It is comforting to know there is the potential for an IRS tax break. And, there are many reasons for under prepaid 2018 taxes. The IRS requires taxpayers to pre-pay their taxes for any tax year. This is requirement is through payroll withholding, estimated tax payments or a combination of the two. Employees and retirees generally accomplish this through withholding. And, self-employed individuals and those with investment income by paying quarterly estimated payments. Continue reading

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Tax Reform is Confusing Part 2

Do you struggle feeling Tax Reform is confusing?

Yes, tax reform is confusing. In part 2 we hope to shed light on other areas of tax reform changes. As mentioned last week, we decided to put together a side-by side comparison of the old and new law. At the end of Part 1’s blog post, is an infographic to help you maneuver all the details behind Tax Reform. Below we will break down Part 2 of this very long infographic for an easier understanding. Let’s go! Continue reading

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Tax Reform and Your Taxes

Well, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) has passed, mainly starting in 2018. Are you confused by tax reform and your taxes, and how this new law will impact you? You’re not alone. As has become the norm for Congress, it played brinksmanship and waited to almost the end of the year, in the midst of the holidays, to pass this very extensive tax bill, providing little time for anyone to plan for 2018.

So that you have an idea about how these changes might affect individual taxpayers like yourself, we have put together some of the key points of the new law. As a suggestion, pull out your 2016 federal return and follow along to get a better understanding of these changes. Continue reading

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Senate Passes the Tax Bill, What’s Next?

Why is it so important that Senate Passes the Tax Bill?

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Heads To Reconciliation

So, Senate passes the tax bill. Yes, the Senate GOP finally brought their version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act out of committee and before the full Senate. Tax Reform, another name for the bill, passed by a narrow margin of 51-49 down party lines. The only dissenting Republican Senator was Bob Corker of Tennessee, who tweets that he reluctantly cast his vote as “no” over long-term fiscal issues. Continue reading

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